Drafting Skirt Variations Using Basic Skirt Block

Updated: Feb 16


Images from ASOS


It’s been a while since i’ve made a drafting video, so here’s one on skirt variations, drafted based on the basic skirt block from the previous post. There are three basic variations in this video, namely:

  1. Pencil Skirt. The hem of a pencil skirt tapers towards the hem. Due to the reduced hem, there is a need (usually) to include a vent, slit or box pleat at the centre back or side seam(s) in order to facilitate walking (or running to catch a bus).

  2. A-Line Skirt. A skirt with a slight flare at the side seams. There is a limit to how much fullness can be needed to the sides before the skirt will start looking rather like a flattened christmas tree.

  3. Flared Skirt. This skirt has a bit more flare than the A-Line Skirt. Using the Slash and Spread method, the dart is being transformed into fullness in the skirt hem.

These are easy to transform from the basic skirt block and are typically easy to construct, especially the A-Line Skirt and Flared Skirt. The construction of the vent/slit/box pleat for the Pencil Skirt take a wee bit more effort and the seam allowance at these areas will differ slightly from what’s stated below.

To convert these blocks to patterns (i.e. amongst other things, i usually include seam allowances before cutting out the paper), the A-Line and Flared Skirts require the following seam allowances:

  1. Waist: 1cm

  2. Side Seam: 1.5cm

  3. Centre Back (assuming the concealed zipper would be inserted here): 2cm

  4. Skirt Hem: 4cm (may be less depending on the finishing)

So, enjoy the quick video! 🙂



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